Introduction of Glass Cockpit Avionics into Light Aircraft National Transportation Safety Board

ISBN:

Published: May 27th 2010

Kindle Edition

106 pages


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Introduction of Glass Cockpit Avionics into Light Aircraft  by  National Transportation Safety Board

Introduction of Glass Cockpit Avionics into Light Aircraft by National Transportation Safety Board
May 27th 2010 | Kindle Edition | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, talking book, mp3, RTF | 106 pages | ISBN: | 8.57 Mb

This study used manufacturer records, aircraft investigation information, and a tailored subset of general aviation activity survey data to assess how the transition to electronic primary flight display (PFD) avionics has affected the safety of lightMoreThis study used manufacturer records, aircraft investigation information, and a tailored subset of general aviation activity survey data to assess how the transition to electronic primary flight display (PFD) avionics has affected the safety of light aircraft.

The study also evaluated the resources and requirements supporting the transition to this new technology. The results of this study suggest that, for the aircraft and time period studied, the introduction of glass cockpit PFDs has not yet resulted in the anticipated improvement in safety when compared to similar aircraft with conventional instruments. Advanced avionics and electronic displays can increase the safety potential of general aviation aircraft operations by providing pilots with more operational and safety-related information and functionality, but more effort is needed to ensure that pilots are prepared to realize that potential.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), manufacturers, aviation industry groups, and academia have an established history of collaboration through the FAA Industry Training Standards (FITS) program initiative for supporting aircraft model-specific and scenario-based training techniques that would teach pilots “higher-order thinking skills.” However, the FAA has changed the focus of the FITS initiative and has to date relied on manufacturers and commercial vendors to deliver the equipment-specific training originally envisioned for FITS.

Adoption of uniform equipment-specific training elements by the FAA to ensure pilots have adequate knowledge of aircraft equipment operation and malfunctions, as well as improved reporting of equipment malfunctions and service difficulties, is likely to improve the safety of general aviation operations beyond those involving aircraft with glass cockpit displays. However, such actions are particularly important in order to achieve the potential safety benefits associated with advanced cockpit technologies in light aircraft.



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